Review: Daphne Byrne hardcover/paperback (DC Comics)

Sunday, October 17, 2021

The problem with playing with spirits is that sometimes spirits play back — at least, that seems to be one of the morals of the fourth release from DC’s Hill House Comics imprint, Laura Marks and Kelley Jones' Daphne Byrne. Indeed the wonderful irony of Byrne is the mission of its young protagonist is to try to expose the duplicitousness of a supposed psychic with nefarious intent even as Daphne herself is seeing ghosts. It makes for a story that’s charming, if not quite as complex as Hill House’s masterful Low, Low Woods. Six issues' worth of art by horror master Jones is still reason enough to check this out.

[Review contains spoilers]

Artist Piotr Jablonski’s covers for most of Daphne Byrne are the stuff of nightmare fuel, hands down the most unsettling Hill House covers so far, with realistic textures and demonic eyes that stare out at the reader. As opposed to Jenny Frisson’s variants on Low, Low Woods, Jablonski’s main Byrne covers are far better than its variants.

Review: Batman: Detective Comics Vol. 6: The Road to Ruin hardcover/paperback (DC Comics)

Wednesday, October 13, 2021

Peter Tomasi’s been shepherding the Bat-family for about 10 years now. Arguably he is as much, if not even more so, a steward of the modern Robin Damian Wayne as the character’s creator Grant Morrison is. Tomasi has seen Damian through a long (even death-defying) run on Batman and Robin, followed by a Superman run that was as much about the Kents as it was Superboy Jon Kent’s burgeoning friendship with Damian (not to mention Super Sons), and into Detective Comics, where Tomasi has narrated Bruce Wayne and Damian’s relationship hitting an increasingly rough patch.

So, with no new Bat-work on the horizon, Tomasi’s Batman: Detective Comics Vol. 6: The Road to Ruin is a notable book, the last in Tomasi’s decade-long Bat-adjacent work and his good-bye to Damian before another writer, Joshua Williamson, takes over Damian’s story in earnest. (Damian’s previous series by Tomasi’s frequent collaborator Patrick Gleason still felt very much within Tomasi’s jurisdiction.)

Review: The Low, Low Woods hardcover/paperback (DC Comics)

Sunday, October 10, 2021

And so we come to the halfway point of the Hill House Comics imprint (an artificial distinction, perhaps, but the third of five books in publication order). The previous books in their own ways have challenged the horror genre, but Carmen Maria Machado and Dani’s The Low, Low Woods is something else. Monsters aplenty, though whether in the box office Woods would be deemed horror or instead fantasy/sci-fi is debatable.

It is not horrific (or horror-ific) in the sense of decapitated heads or lopped off hands. But indeed Woods is horrific, and disturbing, and to an extent the full horror of the book comes so late in the story that one cannot help be, if not horrified in the moment of realization, then horrified in the implications that come days afterward. Basketful of Heads and The Dollhouse Family have each in their own way a joyous kind of popcorn-flavored horror to them, a scary time to be remembered and revisited fondly. Woods also offers the joys of young adulthood and friendship, but in the end again it’s something else, an example of how the horror genre too can be an important reflection of the time in which we’re living.

Review: Superman: Action Comics Vol. 5: The House of Kent trade paperback (DC Comics)

Wednesday, October 06, 2021

I am going to miss Brian Michael Bendis on the Superman titles. I’m not saying Superman: Action Comics Vol. 5: The House of Kent isn’t a little strange, and to be sure there’s a creative choice or two here I don’t agree with. But as with Superman Vol. 4: Mythological, Bendis' final volume on that title, I come away once again with the feeling of Bendis having great affection for this character, and moreover, for his extended family, something that’s been a question among some quarters during Bendis' run. Solely what this book sets its primary sights on, not one but two Superboys, ought tell you most of what you need to know about Bendis and what he sees as the heart of the Super-books.

[Review contains spoilers]

It’s called “The House of Kent” but this book might as well be “A Tale of Two Superboys.” Before Action Comics Vol. 5 gets down to the last hurrah of Metropolis' Invisible Mafia, it’s the story of Superman and guest-star Superboy Jon Kent trying to help other guest-star Superboy Conner Kent figure out why no one remembers him (short of, in a beautiful scene, Ma and Pa Kent, and also Krypto). And despite Red Cloud and the Uber Parasite and the FBI raiding the Daily Planet, a lot of what’s underlying the characters' actions is Conner trying to prove himself and the rest of the Super-family getting to know him, and Bendis makes sure to tuck him away safely before the end.

Review: The Dollhouse Family hardcover/paperback (DC Comics)

Sunday, October 03, 2021

Despite key similarities, M. R. Carey and Peter Gross’s The Dollhouse Family for Hill House Comics is appropriately different from Hill House’s first offering, Basketful of Heads. Whereas Basketful took place in one night over seven chock-full, madcap issues, Dollhouse is a generational story, spanning both centuries and individual lifetimes. Where Basketful offers gritty realism, Dollhouse is supernatural in tone (and where Basketful is also supernatural, Dollhouse dips its toes in sci-fi). The urgency of Basketful puts it ahead if playing favorites, but Dollhouse is also good, especially in its role of companion to Basketful.

If anything, Dollhouse’s generational ghost story with a twist reminds more of classic Vertigo output than does the slasher flick Basketful. Joe Hill’s Basketful is the flashy young upstart that throws a gauntlet down for what DC Black Label horror can be; Dollhouse is a hazy (and devoutly British) blast from the past, akin to one of those Sandman spinoff miniseries Vertigo used to do with much less fanfare. That Vertigo stalwarts Mike “M. R.” Carey and Peter Gross are here has I’m sure no small part to do with it, too.

Review: Basketful of Heads hardcover/paperback (DC Comics)

Wednesday, September 29, 2021

Gripping and irreverent, at times both exploitative and progressive, a tribute to and send-up of classic slasher flick mores, Basketful of Heads is a bold statement about what’s to come from writer Joe Hill’s Hill House Comics imprint from DC Black Label. Whether the other four series in the initial run uphold the same, whether there even is a “what’s to come” for Hill House (only one series has been announced past the initial five) — really, all the existential questions about DC Comics' pop-up imprints — still remains to be seen. But Basketful of Heads (I can’t be the first one to say this) is a basketful of fun, and certainly compels me to check out Hill House’s next offerings.

[Review contains spoilers]

Basketful sees comely coed June Branch chased around an isolated island by increasingly desperate criminals, drawn successively, suggestively soaking wet by artist Leomacs, in the tradition of thrillers since time immemorable. But June also wields — expertly, absurdly — a magical Viking axe that separates heads from bodies but leaves the heads conscious, such that June moves dizzyingly at times between the roles of victim and killer, not to mention such questions as whether June is insane, if all the disembodied heads are just in her head (so to speak), and whether the real “monster” is the crazy axe-murdering girl.

Review: Batman: The World hardcover/paperback (DC Comics)

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Sunday, September 26, 2021

I think the modern era of DC Comics anthologies kicked off with 2018’s Action Comics #10001, a jam session of Superman one-offs by notable creators, followed in quick succession by Detective Comics #1000, Detective Comics #1027, and a variety of anniversary publications. Now we’re into anthologies de rigueur, from the Future State regular-issues-as-anthologies and Batman: Urban Legends to most big titles having a backup or two now. And I would venture these improved as they went on; Detective #1027 sticks out to me as a particularly good one, better than what proceeded it, and Wonder Woman #750 as another.

So whereas an anthology of disconnected one-off stories might not have always been my thing, I was excited for Batman: The World, an original graphic novel collection of Batman stories from various countries, as another of these kinds of jam sessions. And indeed there’s much to like here and I wouldn’t hesitate to recommend The World (it falls neatly in a category I’ve mentioned before of good reads — content-heavy, continuity-light — for a long plane ride).

Review: Justice League United Vol. 2: The Infinitus Saga trade paperback (DC Comics)

Wednesday, September 22, 2021

Way back when, Jeff Lemire’s Justice League United was an interesting concept among the League B-team set. In a long tradition of sub-Leagues, made up of second-stringers and usually more character-focused than the main title, Lemire’s United had the benefit at the outset of starring Green Arrow and Animal Man, two characters with which Lemire had wildly successful runs, plus fan-favorite characters (and/or otherwise following from the recently cancelled Justice League of America series) like Martian Manhunter, Stargirl, Hawkman, and also Supergirl.

Lemire’s first volume of the series sped along nicely, a cosmic-but-heartfelt space romp with most art by Mike McKone. And Lemire of course is a writer of some renown, with those great runs on Green Arrow and Animal Man plus the new-to-TV Sweet Tooth and so on. So one would be forgiven for expecting a lot from Justice League United Vol. 2: The Infinitus Saga, teaming Lemire’s League with no small contingent of DC’s Legion of Super-Heroes. On its own, Lemire writing Legion sounds sublime.

DC Trade Solicitations for December 2021 — Detective Comics Vol. 1: The Neighborhood, Milestone Compendium One, Crime Syndicate, Legion: Before the Darkness Vol. 2, Static Season One, Absolute Dark Nights: Metal and Doomsday Clock

Sunday, September 19, 2021

Well, it’s not like the DC Comics December 2021 trade paperback and hardcover solicitations are disappointing all told.

This month introduces a Barbara Gordon/Stephanie Brown/Cassandra Cain Batgirls series (written by Becky Cloonan), and something called One-Star Squadron with Red Tornado, Power Girl, and Gangbuster (!) in it (hopefully despite the book’s humorous take, writer Mark Russell gives Jose Delgado’s long history a fair shake), and Jeff Lemire and Doug Mahnke on Swamp Thing, and (I had forgotten) Tom Taylor’s Dark Knights of Steel is still going on, plus the Blue & Gold miniseries. As I’ve said recently, the big question was whether post-Dark Nights: Death Metal and the firing of Dan DiDio, we were headed for DC as licensed-properties only, very appeal-to-the-widest-consumer-base stuff, and instead we do seem to be getting a lot of deep cut, fan-love products; it’s hard to be too upset.

That comes with the acknowledgement, however, that there’s only two collections of first-run, main DC Universe material in these solicitations, and that continues to make for some scant months. I think it’ll pick up — or maybe it’s not so bad if it doesn’t — but indeed collections-wise we’re still on the slight side.

Those two main DCU collections, by the by, are Batman: Detective Comics Vol. 1: The Neighborhood, kicking off Mariko Tamaki’s run, and Crime Syndicate, the post-Dark Nights: Death Metal miniseries. Not that those’re the only notable books of the month; we’ve also got Legion of Super-Heroes: Before the Darkness Vol. 2, and I’ll probably finally take my opportunity to read Catwoman When in Rome, too. Also notable are two Milestone titles, Milestone Compendium One (hopefully, finally), and Vita Ayala’s Static: Season One.

Let’s dive in …

Absolute Dark Nights: Metal

Collects Dark Nights: Metal #1-6, Batman: Lost #1, Dark Nights: Metal Director’s Cut #1, and Dark Knights Rising: The Wild Hunt #1. Good for Greg Capullo, especially, getting an Absolute edition of this artwork. I will say I recently re-read Dark Nights: Metal and liked it a lot more than I did the first time.

Absolute Doomsday Clock

I mean, so many mixed feelings about Doomsday Clock in general, but if you didn't read it another way, this is a way to read it. I wonder if the "dozens" of included behind-the-scenes features would help illuminate what this series was supposed to be versus what it actually turned out to be.

Batman Vol. 2: The Joker War

Paperback collecting of Batman #95-100, following the hardcover.

Batman: Detective Comics Vol. 1: The Neighborhood

Everything old is new again, as it often is, with a new Detective Comics Vol. 1, though individual issue numberings remain on track, of course. This is Detective #1034–1039 by Mariko Tamaki and Dan Mora, coming in hardcover in February.

Batman: The Long Halloween: Catwoman When in Rome: The Deluxe Edition

Another volume now newly branded with "Long Halloween." Collects Jeph Loeb and Tim Sale's six-issue miniseries, which I never read; maybe I should take this opportunity with all the Long Halloween hoopla.

Batman: White Knight Presents: Harley Quinn

Paperback, following the hardcover, of the six-issue miniseries by Katana Collins plus the Harley Quinn Black + White + Red tie-in story.

Crime Syndicate

The six-issue miniseries by Andy Schmidt and Kieran McKeown, spinning out of Dark Nights: Death Metal and Infinite Frontier. I’m guessing the backup origin stories drawn by Bryan Hitch appeared in the original issues and aren’t exclusive to this collection.

DC Poster Portfolio: DC Pride

Covers from DC’s Pride Month, due out in May.

Green Arrow: Stranded

YA take on a 13-year-old Oliver Queen by Brendan Deneen and Bell Hosalla.

Harley Quinn & the Birds of Prey: The Hunt for Harley

Paperback, of course, following the hardcover. I enjoyed this well enough, reminding of Amanda Conner and Jimmy Palmiotti’s original Harley run.

The Joker War Saga

Paperback, following the hardcover, of Batman #95-100, the tie-ins from Batgirl, Red Hood and the Outlaws, Catwoman, Harley Quinn, Nightwing, Detective Comics, and the Joker War Zone special.

Legion of Super-Heroes: Before the Darkness Vol. 2

Collects Legion of Super-Heroes #272-283, DC Special Series #21, and Best of DC: Blue Ribbon Digest #24 in hardcover, coming in January.

Milestone Compendium One

I have been very excited for this much delayed collection, which was supposed to include the first dozen or so issues each of Blood Syndicate, Hardware, Icon, Static, and Xombi, plus Shadow Cabinet #0 (the end of the "Shadow War" crossover between the titles). That this latest solicitation lists no contents is worrisome, but I'm still hopeful that the collection fulfills its original intent.

Represent!

In hardcover, collecting DC’s digital-first anthology series, with stories by Christian Cooper and others.

Static: Season One

In hardcover, collecting issues #1-6 of the new Static series by Vita Ayala. Collects Milestone Returns: Infinite Edition #0 and Static: Season One #1-6.

Review: Secret Six Vol. 2: The Gauntlet trade paperback (DC Comics)

Wednesday, September 15, 2021

Gail Simone’s Secret Six, in all its iterations, has been the story of mercenaries for hire, loyal — almost always to a fault — only to each other. Whether helping grieving relatives get justice for a murdered child or protecting a slave trader’s dark fortune, the morality of a Six job hardly matters — until it does.

Should a job get too personal, a Six-er or their family threatened, or even one member’s own interests too far piqued, Six jobs can (and usually do) go wrong. But no matter how many times the Six betray or otherwise try to murder one another, they always come back together in the end, these personalities — often nontraditional in gender or sexuality — knowing where they fit in most is with one another.

By these definitions, Simone’s second Secret Six, which comes to its conclusion in the DC You-era Secret Six Vol. 2: The Gauntlet, is no less valid than the first. Certainly insofar as Simone’s first Secret Six gained members like Black Alice and King Shark, to the point that it was hardly a “Six” by the time it finished anyway, new members like Porcelain and Strix are no less worthy of membership in the Six team than the original-originals.

Review: Secret Six Vol. 1: Friends in Low Places trade paperback (DC Comics)

Sunday, September 12, 2021

Secret Six Vol. 1: Friends in Low Places begins Gail Simone’s second Secret Six series (in the 2014 late-New 52/DC You-era), following her post-Crisis/pre-Flashpoint Secret Six series from 2005-ish to 2011. Simone’s earlier Secret Six is without question one of DC Comics' best series of the 21st century, a book that deserves far more acclaim than it’s ever received, worthy of a top spot on every “best series you’ve never read” list, and so the bar was high for the relaunch.

What we get in Friends is in the end simply confusing. The spirit of Simone’s Six is there, but not perhaps the full-fledged drama and lunacy; if the latter chapters of Simone’s first Six were perpetually turned up to 11, Friends hums along at a 7 or an 8. Like a song that only sounds familiar, the reader starts to sing along only to find the words are actually different; a big 180 in terms of what the book seems to be about versus what it is eventually actually about only muddles things more.

Review: Raven: Daughter of Darkness Vol. 2 trade paperback (DC Comics)

Wednesday, September 08, 2021

I’m pleased that Marv Wolfman’s Raven: Daughter of Darkness Vol. 2, the last of his string of Rebirth-era Raven miniseries, ends on a high note. The initial Raven miniseries was something of a mess, and this successful conclusion seems to point the way forward, though seemingly too little, too late — pulling Raven away from high school theatrics, away especially from Wolfman trying too hard to write “teen-speak,” and toward instead a supporting cast made up entirely of other superheroes. That works much better, reflecting I think where the writer is most comfortable.

It’s a small pity that at least a couple of plot points from across Wolfman’s Raven miniseries never quite get resolved. For at least one of these, it seems Wolfman has opportunity but runs out of real estate or a subsequent miniseries with which to conclude. That’s better though than the plot point from the previous book hurriedly shoehorned into the end of this. In all, however, none of this disturbs that much given that this story stands well enough on its own; short of a detail here and there (especially as relates to one powerful scene), interested readers might be advised to skip all of Wolfman’s lead-up and just start here.

Review: Raven: Daughter of Darkness Vol. 1 trade paperback (DC Comics)

Sunday, September 05, 2021

Marv Wolfman’s Raven: Daughter of Darkness Vol. 1 is an improvement at least on his previous Rebirth era Raven miniseries. For me, I still see Wolfman getting too much in his own way; it’s not necessarily that I don’t like the new, young Raven so much as Wolfman’s “lingo” for Raven and others is not nearly as hip as he thinks it is, making this whole book seem kind of stodgy.

There’s a fine mystery, some reversals, even a villain somewhat trite but unexpected nonetheless — all of that, again, is better than what came before. But Raven is also hampered by the book’s low effort to fill us in on the main character’s recent history or even current origins; when notable events take place or people appear, it’s hard to know necessarily what gravity to give them when we don’t know how common or unusual they are. It makes the reading experience uneven; DC achieves their goal of having a Raven title on the stands at a time it’s worthwhile, but assuredly nothing ground-breaking is accomplished.

Review: Sweet Tooth: The Return trade paperback (DC Comics)

Wednesday, September 01, 2021

“This is a story …” Indeed it is. Jeff Lemire’s Sweet Tooth: The Return is a fantastic coda to his Sweet Tooth saga, apart from but additive to the original books.

To delve much more into the who and how would spoil it, but suffice it to say that I have seen writers return to their masterworks with mixed results, sequels that don’t live up or that make one question whether the good old days were all that good at all. The Return is not that — it is wholly unnecessary for enjoying Sweet Tooth proper, but also emotional and sweet and centered around certain ideas implicit but perhaps not explicit in the original. That’s useful; insomuch as one does not have to have The Return, one would have clearer eyes afterward were they to delve back into the original Sweet Tooth again.

Review: Indiana Jones Omnibus Vol. 2 trade paperback (Dark Horse Comics)

Sunday, August 29, 2021

[Guest reviewer Zach King blogs about movies as The Cinema King. Don’t miss his recent Archaeology August review series of the Indiana Jones movies, celebrating the 40th anniversary of Raiders of the Lost Ark, at the site.]

In my last review, I started to tackle what I take to be the forgotten comic book legacy of Indiana Jones, stating with the first of five out-of-print omnibus collections from Dark Horse Comics. Two trades covered the Dark Horse run of Indy titles, with the other three reprinting the Marvel Comics run from the 1980s.

Since yours truly has never been able to find a copy of those latter three omnibus collections (subtitled The Further Adventures) for any cheaper than four times cover price, I’m left with only the two volumes of Dark Horse material. The first volume did not exactly win me over, collecting stories that seemed dated and overlong. All the same, some Indy is better than no Indy at all, and so I was relieved to find that the second omnibus — Indiana Jones Omnibus, Volume 2 — acquits itself much better than its predecessor. These comics strike a much better balance between adventure and historical context, more expertly utilizing comic book pacing by showing rather than telling.

Review: Gotham City Monsters trade paperback (DC Comics)

Wednesday, August 25, 2021

Frankenstein (the agent of SHADE) has been a favorite of mine since Grant Morrison’s Seven Soldiers and the New 52 Jeff Lemire series, a concept that by definition stretched DC’s usual superheroics toward something more zany. That Frankenstein has continued to appear in titles from Justice League Dark to Batman & Robin has been wonderful to see.

To that end, I’m very pleased for Steve Orlando’s Gotham City Monsters to exist, a book that not only stars Frankenstein but also Andrew Bennett, the titular I, Vampire of DC lore and Joshua Fialkov and Andrea Sorrentino’s also-great New 52 series. Every time these characters are brought out of limbo increases the chances of them being brought out of limbo again, and it seems clear to me within the book that Orlando has the same kind of affection for these characters that I do.

Review: Raven trade paperback (DC Comics)

Sunday, August 22, 2021

I have a lack of new DC titles to read right now, to the point where I just recently re-read Dark Nights: Metal in sequential order rather than by collections (and enjoyed it quite a bit more than I did before). The Raven character plays a small but unexpectedly meaningful role around the edges of Metal, and noting that two recent Raven miniseries by Marv Wolfman were published just before and around Metal, I was curious to see if there was any acknowledgment of or tie-in to Metal’s events. (There is not, at least as far as the miniseries, just called Raven, is concerned.)

I will say that I’ve found Raven’s portrayals since the New 52 — and earlier, even — somewhat lackluster; to me, the same cynical lack of imagination that sees the powerful, often self-assured mystic Raven of the 1980s recreated as an angsty teenager is the same that turns deaf pacifist Jericho into a bloodthirsty (and hearing) villain. Wolfman and George Perez' creations in the 1980s were interesting and bucked superhero traditions; since that time, some attempts to make the characters “edgy” have only resulted in making them stereotypical and safe.

DC Trade Solicitations for November 2021 — Batman: Urban Legends Vol. 1, Rorschach and Strange Adventures by King, Teen Titans Academy Vol. 1, Crisis on Multiple Earths Book Two, Flintstones Deluxe by Russell, Wonder Woman: Afterworlds

Wednesday, August 18, 2021

It’s the DC Comics trade paperback and hardcover solicitations for November 2021. As is sometimes the case, we just got done talking about the DC Comics Spring 2022 catalog solicitations, so not too-too much new information here, though some details to shade in as some solicitations get updated information.

On the general news front, I was sorry to see James Tynion leaving DC for creator-owned pastures. Seems to me he was doing some “new paradigm for Batman” work that was going to take a while to unfold, and I’m doubtful that will come to everything he wanted nor that others will take up the selfsame banner once he sets it down. It also begs the question, at a time when overall we’ve been wondering what the direction of DC will be under new leadership — pondering, even, if DC will continue to have a “DC Universe” or if things might become more standalone and one-off-ish toward a greater value on simple IP — who’s leading DC’s creative vision?

Following Tynion’s own logic of “five eras of Batman” — of which the Morrison-Snyder-King era ends with Tynion — there’s no clear heir apparent to pick up the mantle; that was essentially Tynion. The new “Shadows of the Bat” event seems to be guided by Mariko Tamaki, which is great, but Tamaki hasn’t been with the franchise long enough for me to glean whether her ambitions might continue to Justice League or a line-wide crossover (it’s up in the air whether a Detective Comics-lead crossover will even turn out to be an important Batman event or something more like the “Resurrection of Ra’s al Ghul” footnote).

Another likely candidate for DC’s “lead writer” is Joshua Williamson, given that he’s got the various Infinite Frontier titles and has been teasing big things to come; I think Williamson is most likely to steer DC’s big story ship and I’ve long admired his genuine-seeming love for DC, though I’ve found much with which to quibble in his actual work. Brian Michael Bendis has Justice League right now, usually the step before running a big DC crossover (and DC would be silly not to get a true line-wide Bendis event in their backlist), though his reduced title count and all his Jinxworld books moving to Dark Horse makes one wonder how long he is for DC. (And most assuredly whatever Amazon is willing to pay Tynion for content, they’re ready to pay at least as much to Bendis.)

My final long-shot guess for “DC story lead” is Tom Taylor, and that’s hardly so much of a long-shot as it used to be. I only ding Taylor a little as compared to Williamson or Bendis because Taylor doesn’t have that much experience writing dedicated runs within the mainstream DC universe, but that’s changing fast with both his Superman series and Nightwing. And Taylor has swiftly proved himself to be the best writer in the bunch; I wouldn’t at all be disappointed if DC moved Taylor to Batman to replace Tynion, and on up from there.

Oh, you came here to talk about DC’s November 2021 collections? Well, high on the list is Batman: Urban Legends Vol. 1, which is still solicited as a book of Grifter and Red Hood stories, but if DC collects all of issues #1–6 for this book, that’ll include the landmark Tim Drake story as well. The Infinite Frontier train keeps rolling this month with collections of the new Harley Quinn, Green Lantern, Nightwing, Teen Titans Academy, and Wonder Woman.

If you can’t get enough of what Tom King’s going to do this time, these solicitations have both the Rorschach and Strange Adventures collections, and I’m pleased to see that King is one writer still getting work at DC with his Supergirl and Human Target miniseries (plus whenever Batman/Catwoman finishes). Long-time readers will cheer and sigh that DC’s picked up collecting the Crisis on Multiple Earths stories again, with the second book in these listings. If the Flintstones deluxe edition were coming out right now, given I’m in something of a drought of DC titles to read, I’d pick it up in a heartbeat.

So OK — let’s take the big look.

All-Star Superman: The Deluxe Edition

Perhaps kind of astounding this didn’t already exist, it’s a deluxe-size edition of the 12-issue miniseries by Grant Morrison and Frank Quitely.

Annotated Sandman Vol. 1

With the Netflix show getting closer and closer, this is issues #1-20 (being Preludes and Nocturnes, Doll's House, and Dream Country, due out in March in hardcover. Annotated by award-winning researcher Leslie S. Klinger.

The Batman Box Set

Batman: The Long Halloween, Batman: Ego and Other Tails, and Batman: Year One, seemingly in a The Batman movie-branded box.

Batman vs. Ra's Al Ghul

Hardcover collection of the new Neal Adams six-issue miniseries.

Batman: The Caped Crusader Vol. 6

Collects Batman #475-483 and Detective Comics #642, including the Ventriloquist and Maxie Zeus, and creative teams including Alan Grant and Norm Breyfogle, and Doug Moench and Jim Aparo. Notably, this book ends right where the Batman: Prelude to Knightfall collection begins; the solicitation doesn't call this the last volume, but I wouldn't be surprised if it is. If so, I'm so glad this collection series of Batman's post-Crisis adventures made it to its finish point, and what a wonderful set of books. I can only hope DC does the same thing with post-Crisis Superman at least up to "Death of Superman."

Batman: Urban Legends Vol. 1

Said to be Batman: Urban Legends #1-6. The solicitation only mentions Red Hood and Grifter by Chip Zdarsky and Matthew Rosenberg respectively, but unless DC is going to split these up by character instead of issue, then this may very well also collect the notable three-part Tim Drake story by Meghan Fitzmartin.

Batman/Superman: The Archive of Worlds

This had been previously solicited as Vol. 1, but is now just “Archive of Worlds” on its own. That probably reflects the fact that this book has already been cancelled, and though contents aren’t listed, probably this is #16-22 from Gene Luen Yang, Ivan Reis, and company. I had high hopes for this from Gene Luen Yang, given that depicting the Golden Age Superman seems to have been where he's had the most success with DC, though clearly the market wasn’t there.

Crisis on Multiple Earths Book 2: Crisis Crossed

Pre-Crisis multiversal team-ups, including the Justice League, the Justice Society, Earth-X and the Freedom Fighters, Captain Marvel and the Marvel family, the Legion of Super-Heroes, Jonah Hex and more, being Justice League of America #91-92, #100-102, #107-108, #113-124, #135-137, #147-148, and #159-160. These are more-issue reprints of the former Crisis on Multiple Earths collections; this volume collects the third and fourth volumes of those and into the fifth.

DMZ Compendium Two

Re-collecting the final half of the Brian Wood series in paperback, issues #37-72.

Fables Compendium Four

The final Fables compendium volume, said to collect issues #114-150.

Fables: The 20th Anniversary Box Set

Seems to collect the four Fables Compendium volumes, being issues #1-150 plus The Last Castle, 1001 Nights of Snowfall, Werewolves of the Heartland, Jack of Fables #33-35, and The Literals #1-3.

The Flash By Geoff Johns Omnibus Vol. 3

Arrives now at collecting Geoff Johns' post-Wally West work with Barry Allen. Said to collect Final Crisis: Rogue’s Revenge #1-3, Flash: Rebirth #1-6, Flash #1-12, Blackest Night: The Flash #1-3, Flash Secret Files and Origins 2010 #1, and Flashpoint #1-5.

The Flintstones: The Deluxe Edition

In hardcover in February, collecting Mark Russell and Steve Pugh's entire Flintstones run — Flintstones #1-12 and the Booster Gold/The Flintstones Special.

Gen 13: Starting Over: The Deluxe Edition

At one point this was said to collect Gen13: Lost in Paradise #1, Gen13 #1-5, Gen13 European Vacation #1, Gen13 Backlist #1, Gen13 #0-5, Wildstorm Universe Sourcebook #1, and Gen13: Encore No. 1. This most recent solicitation has it at the #0-5 issues of the first and second volumes of Gen13 plus pages from the Wildstorm Universe Sourcebook #1.

Green Lantern Vol 1: Invictus

In paperback in December, starring John Stewart, Teen Lantern Keli Quintela, and Far Sector's Jo Mullein. Previous solicitations said this collected Future State: Green Lantern #1-2 and Green Lantern #1-4; the earlier solicitation also mentioned Jessica Cruz (possibly in reference to Future State), though that’s been removed from this new solicitation.

Harley Quinn Vol. 1: No Good Deed

The first post-Future State volume by Stephanie Nicole Phillips and Riley Rossmo, in hardcover.

Justice League by Scott Snyder Deluxe Edition Book Three

Issues #26-39 of the Scott Snyder series, being the tail end of the Sixth Dimension collection plus the Justice/Doom War collection.

Mister Miracle: The Great Escape

A YA take on Mister Miracle by Varian Johnson and Daniel Isles. This looks promising and I’d be eager to see it have future volumes, especially if the author intends to trace some of the twists and turns of Scott Free’s New Genesis origins.

Nightwing Vol. 1: Leaping Into the Light

The first Nightwing volume post-Future State, renumbered again, by Tom Taylor and Bruno Redondo. Previously said to collects issues #78-83 in paperback, but this solicitation shows hardcover.

Rorschach

In hardcover, collecting issues #1-12 by Tom King and Jorge Fornes. Previously this has been solicited to come out the same day as King’s Strange Adventures hardcover; now this is December 7 and Strange Adventures is December 14. Still a good time for King fans.

The Sandman: The Deluxe Edition Book Five

Collects Sandman #70-75, Sandman: The Dream Hunters #1-4, Sandman: Endless Nights, Sandman: Dream Hunters 30th Anniversary Edition (prose version), and Dust Covers: The Collected Sandman Covers. Arriving in February in hardcover. Interesting, the solicitation calls this “the final deluxe harcover,” so it looks like Overture won’t be included in these books, perhaps because the miniseries already has a deluxe edition on its own. Still might’ve been nice to have a complete run with the same branding on the shelf.

Strange Adventures

In hardcover by Tom King, Mitch Gerads, and Doc Shaner, collecting Strange Adventures #1-12. Comes out December 14, the week after King’s Rorschach hardcover.

Superman: Red & Blue

Hardcover collecting issues #1-6, with stories by John Ridley, Brandon Easton and Steve Lieber, Wes Craig, and Marguerite Bennett and Jill Thompson.

Teen Titans Academy Vol. 1: X Marks The Spot

In hardcover, coming in January, the first collection of the series by Tim Sheridan and Rafa Sandoval.

Wonder Woman Vol. 1: Afterworlds

In paperback, the first post-Future State volume (with new numbering) by Becky Cloonan, Michael Conrad, and Travis Moore. Not that it’s that much of a mystery, but this solicitation spoils one plot point from the end of Dark Nights: Death Metal.

Review: Indiana Jones Omnibus Vol. 1 trade paperback (Dark Horse Comics)

Sunday, August 15, 2021

[Guest reviewer Zach King blogs about movies as The Cinema King. Don’t miss his recent Archaeology August review series of the Indiana Jones movies, celebrating the 40th anniversary of Raiders of the Lost Ark, at the site.]

I never had a dog, but I’ve got a lot of fond memories of my father bringing home Raiders of the Lost Ark from a McDonald’s promotional VHS giveaway. Judging by the dates (Christmas 1991), I may even have seen the Indiana Jones movies before I saw Star Wars – which is a huge revelation for me. Unlike Star Wars, however, Indiana Jones didn’t seem to have a comparable afterlife in merchandise and expanded universe material. We’ve only gotten a smattering of novels, a handful of video games, and the occasional Lego set.

Black Adam: Rise and Fall, DC Pride 2021, Question by O'Neil Omnibus, Talon by Tynion, Batwing: Luke Fox, Blue Beetle Jaime Reyes reprints, Infinite Frontier, Shazam! Thundercrack, Doom Patrol by Pollack, more in DC Comics Spring 2022 solicitations

Wednesday, August 11, 2021

If there’s a “new DC” on the rise, the DC Comics Spring 2022 trade paperback and hardcover catalog solicitations feel like perhaps our next, best indication of what that is — lots of omnibuses, lots of media tie-in books. Which is not to say we don’t also have collections of classic material, collections of ongoing titles, and so on, but wow — 15 omnibuses on this list, and more Batman, Black Adam, and Sandman than you can shake a stick at. Not that there’s anything wrong with that.

Standout surprises for me include the Question by Dennis O’Neil Omnibus (though I’m hoping of course this begets a new round of paperbacks) and Talon by James Tynion, a series I’ve been meaning to finish for a while (though too little, too late, apparently, in getting Tynion to stay). The aforementioned Black Adam books include a weird one, Black Adam: Rise and Fall of an Empire, a remix of just the Black Adam parts of the 52 weekly series(!). Some of you will be happy to see the Birds of Prey collections continuing with Birds of Prey: Whitewater, others of you will be thrilled to hear about the Who’s Who Omnibus Vol. 2, and everyone should support the DC Pride 2021 collection, though I have some hesitation about how DC decided to fill that book out.

What else? Everything that’s old is new again with new first volumes of Detective Comics Vol. 1 and Action Comics Vol. 1 as well as new hardcover collections set in Batman '89 and Superman '78 (bumped from the Fall 2021 solicitations, apparently) — what a weird, weird world we live in where anything is possible. My favorite, the dedicated collections of post-Crisis Batman, keep on ticking with Batman: The Dark Knight Detective Vol. 7. And Infinite Frontier and Batman Vol. 5: Fear State bring DC’s latest big events to collections; Batman: Urban Legends Vol. 2 should have everyone waiting to see what this title will do for an encore.

[Follow Collected Editions on Facebook and Twitter, and don’t miss our DC Comics Trade Paperback Timeline.]

Lots, lots, lots, oh my gosh so much more to talk about. All my thoughts on these and more books down below.

52 Omnibus (2022 Edition)

New collection of the omnibus by Geoff Johns, Grant Morrison, Greg Rucka, and Mark Waid. The previous edition collected 52 issues #1-52 though not the DC: World War III tie-in miniseries; no word whether this will be the same or different.

100 Bullets Omnibus Vol. 2

In hardcover, collecting 100 Bullets #59-100 and 100 Bullets: Brother Lono #1-8.

Absolute Dark Nights: Metal

Collects Dark Nights: Metal #1-6, Batman: Lost #1, Dark Nights: Metal Director’s Cut #1, and Dark Knights Rising: The Wild Hunt #1. Good for Greg Capullo, especially, getting an Absolute edition of this artwork. I will say I recently re-read Dark Nights: Metal and liked it a lot more than I did the first time.

Absolute Dark Nights: Metal (Exclusive Edition)

No idea what this will have different from the “regular” Absolute.

Absolute Doomsday Clock

I mean, so many mixed feelings about Doomsday Clock in general, but if you didn't read it another way, this is a way to read it.

[See the latest DC trade solicitations.]

Annotated Sandman Vol. 1 (2022 Edition)

With the Netflix show getting closer and closer, this is issues #1-20 (being Preludes and Nocturnes, Doll's House, and Dream Country, due out in March in hardcover. Annotated by award-winning researcher Leslie S. Klinger.

Batman '89

In hardcover in July by Sam Hamm and Joe Quinones, collecting the first 12 chapters of the digital series.

Batman Vol. 2: The Joker War

Paperback collecting of Batman #95-100, following the hardcover.

Batman Vol. 5: Fear State

In hardcover in March 2022, said to collect Batman #112–117, part of the “Fear State” event across a number of titles.

Batman vs. Bigby! A Wolf in Gotham

The new six-issue miniseries by Bill Willingham, relaunching Fables. In paperback in April.

Batman: Detective Comics Vol. 1

Everything old is new again, as it often is, as these solicitations see both Detective Comics Vol. 1 and Action Comics Vol. 1, though individual issue numberings remain on track, of course. This is Detective #1034–1039 by Mariko Tamaki and Dan Mora, coming in hardcover in February.

Batman: Detective Comics Vol. 2

In hardcover in July, collecting Detective Comics #1040-1046 and Batman Secret Files: Huntress #1 by Mariko Tamaki and company.

Batman: Fear State Saga

"The Batman: Fear State Event is collected like never before!" says the solicitation, which, yes, is a factual statement. This includes Batman #112-117 (also collected on its own as Batman Vol. 5: Fear State), Batman Secret Files: The Gardener #1, Batman Secret Files: Peacekeeper #1, Batman Secret Files: Miracle Molly #1, Batman: Fear State: Alpha #1, Batman: Fear State: Omega #1. Indeed, that's a lot of Batman: Secret Files titles, and does not include the I Am Batman, Harley Quinn, or Catwoman issues of "Fear State." So we'll see to what extent these contents stand; said to be in hardcover coming in April.

Batman: One Dark Knight

In hardcover in July, collecting the three-issue miniseries written and drawn by Jock.

Batman: Reptilian

In hardcover in May, collecting the six-issue miniseries by Garth Ennis and Liam Sharp.

Batman: The Adventures Continue Season Two

Issues #1-7 of the second “season” by Alan Burnett, Paul Dini, Ty Templeton, and Monica Kubina, bringing the Court of Owls to Batman: The Animated Series.

Batman: The Dark Knight Detective Vol. 7

Batman #474, Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight #27, Detective Comics #634-638, Detective Comics #641, Detective Comics #643, and Detective Comics Annual #4. Batman and Legends are in there as part of the "Destroyer" crossover, which introduced a new-look Gotham in line with the first Tim Burton movie; the annual is an "Armageddon 2001" tie-in. Stories written by Kelley Puckett, Louise Simonson, Peter Milligan, and Alan Grant. Pretty sure this series has one more volume to go to end before "Knightfall" and Detective #654.

Batman: The Detective

In hardcover, collecting the six-issue miniseries by Tom Taylor and Andy Kubert. That’s a powerhouse team — Kubert draws a great Batman, and Taylor’s star is on the rise. I might not usually stop for the Batman miniseries of the week, but I’m eager to see what these two do together. Coming in February.

Batman: The Imposter

Elseworlds-type Batman story by writer of the upcoming movie Mattson Tomlin, with art by the inimitable Andrea Sorrentino. Fascinating that even before the start of the three-issue miniseries, DC already announced in press release the ship date of the hardcover collection, February 2022.

Batman: The Long Halloween: Catwoman: When in Rome: The Deluxe Edition

Another volume now newly branded with "Long Halloween." Collects Jeph Loeb and Tim Sale's six-issue miniseries, which I never read and maybe should take this opportunity with all the Long Halloween hoopla.

Batman: The Penguin

Timed, of course, for Colin Farrell's turn as Penguin in the new Batman movie, this is said to be Batman #155, Batman #374, Batman #548, Batman #549, Detective Comics #610, Detective Comics #611, Detective Comics #824, Joker's Asylum: Penguin #1, and Penguin Triumphant #1. Missing in that list is Detective Comics #58, Penguin's first appearance, which was collected (along with the rest of these) in Batman Arkham: Penguin. Possibly this is just a reprint under another name.

Batman: The Silver Age Omnibus Vol. 1

Collects Batman #101–116 and Detective Comics #233–257.

Batman: Urban Legends Vol. 2

Collects issues #7-10 of the anthology series; said to include stories about Terry McGinnis and Cassandra Cain, among others.

Batman: White Knight Presents: Harley Quinn

Paperback, following the hardcover, of the six-issue miniseries by Katana Collins plus the Harley Quinn Black + White + Red tie-in story.

Batwing: Luke Fox

The oft-solicited (and cancelled) Batwing Omnibus finds new life as a Batwing: Luke Fox collection. Don’t get me wrong, I love Camrus Johnson on Batwoman and especially his turn in the season finale, but these stories by Jimmy Palmiotti and Justin Gray (Batwing #19–34 and the Futures End issue) were not the best of the series. That distinction goes to the first dozen or so issues by Judd Winick, starring Congolese police office David Zavimbe as Batwing; I rather wish those were sharing in the spotlight.

Birds of Prey: Whitewater

I think many will be happy to see the collections of the first Birds of Prey series continuing. This is issues #104–112, marking the end of Gail Simone’s run (for this volume) and the start of Tony Bedard’s. Simone’s Secret Six appear a couple of times.

Black Adam Box Set

It feels a little bit like the late 1990s/early 2000s again, but among the many good things about the forthcoming Black Adam movie is a bevy of Black Adam collections materials. This box set — a Black Adam box set, can you even imagine? — collects what’s now called Black Adam/JSA: Black Reign (formerly JSA Vol. 8: Black Reign, being JSA #56–58 and Hawkman #23–25, with the JSA losing the top billing in their own book), Shazam! Vol. 1 (the Geoff Johns/Gary Frank backup from the New 52 Justice League), and Black Adam: Rise and Fall of an Empire, a cut down of relevant pages from the 52 weekly series that I’ll discuss more elsewhere.

Black Adam: Rise and Fall of an Empire

This would be kind of a double-dip purchase for me, but at the same time I’m very curious how it’ll read. Essentially this is just the Black Adam material from the 52 weekly series, said to collect stories from 52 #1–3, 6–10, 12–16, 18–26, 29–34, 36–40, 43–50, and 52. It has been a while since I read 52 but I feel like the stories were very interwoven, especially toward the end, and I wonder to what extent a cogent story can be told with just the Black Adam parts and not the Elongated Man or Question parts. At the same time, I’m now very interested in a Pulp Fiction-esque set of interweaving 52 collections, this one with all the Black Adam material, that one with all the Question Renee Montoya material, and so on.

Black Adam: The Dark Age (New Edition)

New printing of the six-issue miniseries by Peter Tomasi and Doug Mahnke, in paperback next July. I reviewed Black Adam: The Dark Age some 10 years ago.

Black Adam/JSA: Black Reign (New Edition)

New edition of JSA Vol. 8: Black Reign, which collected JSA #56–58 and Hawkman #23–25. Apparently getting a movie gives Black Adam top billing in the JSA's own book. The solicitation says this also includes JSA: Black Reign #1, which isn’t a thing that I think ever existed unless that’s meant to indicate the original collection’s cover. I reviewed JSA: Black Reign some 15 years ago.

Blue Beetle: Jaime Reyes Book One

Issues #1-12 of the original Jaime Reyes Blue Beetle series by Keith Giffen and Cully Hamner. It'll be interesting to see if DC would continue this through Jaime's various continuities — this, the post-Crisis series, then the New 52 series, then the Rebirth series.

Catwoman of East End Omnibus

Rather surprised this has never been an omnibus before. Surely collects the Detective Comics backup stories, issues #759–762, plus Ed Brubaker's 24-issue run with Darwyn Cooke and Cameron Stewart, plus the Selina's Big Score graphic novel and sundries.

Catwoman Vol. 6

In paperback in May, this collects Ram V’s Catwoman #34-38, including the tie-in to the “Batman: Fear State” event.

Challenge of the Super Sons

In paperback in March, collecting Challenge of the Super Sons #1-7 by Peter Tomasi.

Checkmate

In paperback in June, collecting the miniseries by Brian Michael Bendis and Alex Maleev. There’s still an Event Leviathan special uncollected, which I hope they include here.

Crush & Lobo

In paperback, in May, the eight-issue miniseries by Mariko Tamaki and Amancay Nahuelpan. I'd rather like to see them include Tamaki's Crush story from Let Them Live!: Unpublished Tales from the DC Vault #6 as well.

Dark Nights: Death Metal

Paperback collection of Dark Knights: Death Metal #1-7, in April.

DC Comics: Generations

In paperback, following the hardcover.

DC Horror Presents: The Conjuring: The Lover

In hardcover in March, collecting the five-issue series and tying in to the Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It movie, written by Conjuring screenwriter David L. Johnson-McGoldrick and Rex Ogle with art by Garry Brown and covers from Bill Sienkiewicz.

DC One Million Omnibus (2022 Edition)

Contents so far seem the same as the original DC One Million Omnibus, including DC One Million #1-4, the #1,000,000 issues of Action Comics, Adventures of Superman, Aquaman, Azrael, Batman, Batman: Shadow of the Bat, Catwoman, Chase, Chronos, Creeper, Detective Comics, Flash, Green Arrow, Green Lantern, Hitman, Impulse, JLA, Legion of Super-Heroes, Legionnaires, Lobo, Martian Manhunter, Nightwing, Power of Shazam, Resurrection Man, Robin, Starman, Superboy, Supergirl, Superman, Superman: The Man of Steel, Superman: The Man of Tomorrow, Wonder Woman and Young Justice*, plus Booster Gold #1,000,000, DC One Million 80-Page Giant #1, and Superman/Batman #79–80 (minus the creator-owned Young Heroes in Love issue).

DC Poster Portfolio: DC Pride

Covers from DC’s Pride Month, due out in May.

DC Poster Portfolio: Frank Quitely

No contents listed, but surely All-Star Superman, Flex Mentallo, what have you.

DC Poster Portfolio: J.H. Williams III

Williams’ covers “from Batman to Promethea.”

DC Poster Portfolio: Jenny Frison

Jenny Frison’s Wonder Woman covers have been quite impressive; this one arrives in June.

DC Pride 2021

I wondered if DC Pride would recieve a collection and I'm glad that it is. At the same time I'm unsure about the items collected with it. On one hand, yes, I'm equally happy to see DC's recent disparate specials also collected — Mysteries of Love in Space, New Year's Evil, Young Monsters in Love. And I grant that these fall backward into the DC Pride theme by having stories of LGBTQIA+ characters in them, Crush and Harley Quinn among others. But also it kind of posits Pride Month as a Hallmark holiday a la Valentine's or New Year's instead of a recognition of a marginalized group that deserves representation; put another way, DC Price is not the same thing as Young Monsters in Love. I'd as soon have seen DC pair DC Pride with key stories about Aqualad, Alan Scott, Renee Montoya, Batwoman, Obsidian, Apollo and Midnighter, etc., or stories from Love Is Love. Or with the DC Festival of Heroes celebration of Asian Heritage Month and call the whole thing DC Heroes: A Celebration of Diversity or whatnot. This collection as it is doesn't quite seem on the mark.

DC Title

Despite the name, this appears to be a collection of the art from the Audible Sandman Instagram account, in which dreams submitted by listeners were drawn by artists including Tony Harris, Colleen Doran, and Kelley Jones.

DCeased: Dead Planet

Paperback of issues #1-7 by Tom Taylor, following the hardcover.

DCeased: Hope At World's End

In paperback, following the hardcover.

Death and Return of Superman Omnibus (2022 Edition)

It is interesting all these omnibuses are being reprinted. Near as I can tell, nothing different here than in the previous edition.

Death: The Deluxe Edition (2022 Edition)

Contents seem to be the same as the earlier edition: Death: The High Cost of Living #1-3, Death: The Time of Your Life #1-3, the “Death Talks about Life” AIDS pamphlet, stories from Vertigo: Winter’s Edge #2 and Sandman: Endless Nights, the short story “The Wheel” from the 9-11 tribute book, and Sandman #8 and #20.

Doom Patrol by Rachel Pollack Omnibus

Filling a long-unfilled gap in the Grant Morrison-era Doom Patrol collections, this collects Doom Patrol #64-87, Doom Patrol Annual #2, Totems #1, and Vertigo Jam #1 by Rachel Pollack, with art by Ted McKeever among others. This had been solicited previously and cancelled, so I'm glad to see it back again, though I'd prefer smaller volumes than an omnibus. I'd also like to see the lead-in to Morrison's Doom Patrol, the issues #1-18 et al., collected in something other than an omnibus too.

Fables 20th Anniversary Box Set

Maybe this is all 22 (paperback) or 15 (deluxe) or four ("compendium") editions, but gosh that'd be a big box either way.

Future State: Gotham Vol. 1

The Future State anthology series launches with a Red Hood story by Joshua Williamson; said to collect Future State: Gotham #1–7 and Future State: Dark Detective #2–4 (presumably the Red Hood stories).

Galaxy: The Prettiest Star

YA graphic novel by Jadzia Axelrod and Jess Taylor, about an alien princess living in hiding as a boy on Earth and the girl from Metropolis who changes everything. I’m very pleased to see these YA books set against a DC universe backdrop but with new and interesting characters.

Gotham Central Omnibus (2022 Edition)

A new Gotham Central omnibus, happy to see it remain in print, though the contents don't seem to be more than the original issues #1-40 ("Officer Down," anyone?)

Gotham Central: In the Line of Duty

Collects Gotham Central issues #1-10, including the "In the Line of Duty" and "Half a Life" stories.

Green Arrow: Stranded

YA take on a 13-year-old Oliver Queen by Brendan Deneen and Bell Hosalla.

Green Lantern Vol. 1: Invictus

In paperback in June, spinning out of Infinite Frontier, this is Green Lantern #1-6 by Geoffrey Thorne and Tom Raney. Starring John Stewart, Teen Lantern Keli Quintela, and Sojourner “Jo” Mullein — I'm excited about this one.

Green Lantern: Alliance

New YA volume by Minh Le and Andie Tong with Green Lantern Tai Pham, teamed up with a new Kid Flash.

Hardware: Season One

In hardcover, by Brandon Thomas and Denys Cowan, collecting the first six issues of the new series and Milestone Returns: Infinite Edition #0. Coming in April.

Harley Quinn & the Birds of Prey: The Hunt for Harley

Paperback, of course, following the hardcover.

Hellblazer: Rise and Fall

Paperback collection of the three-issue miniseries by Tom Taylor.

Icon & Rocket: Season One

In hardcover in June, collecting Icon & Rocket: Season One #1-6 by Reginald Hudlin and Doug Braithwaite.

Infinite Frontier

The next phase of the DC Universe, by Joshua Williamson, in hardcover coming in February. Said to collect Infinite Frontier #0–6 and Infinite Frontier Secret Files #1.

Injustice: Gods Among Us: Year Zero - The Complete Collection

In paperback, collecting issues #1-14, featuring the Justice Society in the Injustice universe.

John Constantine, Hellblazer Vol. 26: The Curse of the Constantines

A new edition of what was largely the Death and Cigarettes collection, this is Hellblazer #292-300, Hellblazer Special: Bad Blood #1-4, and Hellblazer Annual #1 by Peter Milligan and company.

Justice League by Scott Snyder Deluxe Edition Book Three

Issues #26-39 of the Scott Snyder series, being the tale end of the Sixth Dimension collection plus the Justice/Doom War collection.

Justice League Dark

The solicitation for this one is all sorts of confused, conflating Brian Michael Bendis' new Justice League run with the Justice League Dark annual from James Tynion’s run, at a page count of 1,440 pages and $150 (which probably refers to the Justice League Dark Omnibus). My guess is this is paperback, regular price, collecting Ram V’s JLD backup stories from Bendis' Justice League #59–71 and — though not announced yet — what seems to be a Justice League Dark Annual 2021.

Justice League Infinity

In paperback in June, collecting the seven-part series based on Justice League Unlimited.

Justice League Vol. 1: Prisms

Said to collect Brian Michael Bendis’ Justice League #59-63 in hardcover, in May.

Justice League: Last Ride Vol. 1

In paperback in June, collecting the seven-issue miniseries by Chip Zdarsky and Miguel Mendonca.

Justice League: The New 52 Omnibus Vol. 2

This is a large one. Collecting the entire second half of Geoff Johns' New 52 Justice League, issues #24-52, plus (deep breath) Forever Evil #1-7, DC Universe: Rebirth #1, DC Sneak Peek: Justice League #1, Justice League feat. Secret Society #23.4, Justice League of America feat. Black Adam #7.4, Justice League: Darkseid War Special #1, Justice League: Darkseid War: Batman #1, Justice League: Darkseid War: The Flash #1, Justice League: Darkseid War: Green Lantern #1, Justice League: Darkseid War: Lex Luthor #1, Justice League: Darkseid War: Shazam #1, and Justice League: Darkseid War: Superman #1 — so, as you can see, from Forever Evil all the way to Darkseid War and the end of the New 52. The two "Villain's Month" titles have only elsewhere been collected in the DC Comics: The New 52: Villains Omnibus, if I'm not mistaken.

Legion of Super-Heroes: Five Years Later Omnibus Vol. 2

Continuing this collections series, including L.E.G.I.O.N. #69-70. Legion of Super-Heroes #40-61, Legion of Super-Heroes Annual #4-5 ("Bloodlines" and Elseworlds), Legionnaires #1-18, Legionnaires Annual #1 (Elseworlds), Valor #20-23, and Who's Who Update 1993 #1. For those playing along at home, this is the end of the series, including the Zero Hour tie-ins ahead of the full reboot for Zero Month. This is the “Five Years Later” era, though I don’t tend to associate it with that since it’s less “five years later-y” than the early Keith Giffen material.

Midnighter: The Complete Collection

“Complete collection” might be a bit of a misnomer, but this is a full collection of the quite enjoyable Midnighter tales by Steve Orlando and ACO, previously collected in three volumes. This is DC Sneak Peek: Midnighter #1, the DC You era Midnighter #1-12, Midnighter and Apollo #1-6.

Milestone Compendium One

I have thought from time to time about trying to pick up all the existing Milestone trades — here DC just made it easy for me. This is, at the least, Blood Syndicate #1-12, Hardware #1-12, Icon #1-10, Static #1-8, and Xombi #0-11, and Shadow Cabinet #0. Hopefully this keeps going through the rest of the Milestone books and monies, through to Milestone’s appearances in the regular DCU and the character appearances from the late 2000s Brave and the Bold series. For reference, the Worlds Collide crossover with coincide with the next book.

Mister Miracle: The Great Escape

A YA take on Mister Miracle by Varian Johnson and Daniel Isles. This looks promising and I’d be eager to see it have future volumes, especially if the author intends to trace some of the twists and turns of Scott Free’s New Genesis origins.

Mister Miracle: The Source of Freedom

The six-issue miniseries by Brandon Easton and Fico Ossio, spinning out of Future State.

New Gods Book Two: Advent of Darkness

Continuing to collect the 1990s New Gods series. The first volume collected issues #1-14, so this could finish it out with #15-28. Look for Lar Gand of L.E.G.I.O.N. and the Forever People to appear.

Nice House on the Lake Vol. 1

James Tynion is making splashes in the creator-owned horror genre, and DC surely wants a piece of it (... wrote this and then the news came out). Collects issues #1-6 with his Detective Comics artist Alvaro Martinez.

Nightwing Vol. 2

By Tom Taylor and Bruno Redondo, this collects Nightwing #84-88 and the Nightwing 2021 annual. The solicitation says this ties in to Fear State; I know there’s a triptych cover involved though I don’t necessarily see “Fear State” in the issue solicitations so far.

Phantom Stranger Omnibus

This was previously announced in DC Comics Fall 2020 solicitations in March 2020, so not entirely surprising it never made it to print. Here it is again, due out in May 2022, collecting The Phantom Stranger #1-6 (1952), The Phantom Stranger #1-41 (1969), stories from Saga of the Swamp Thing #1-13, Who’s Who: The Definitive Directory of the DC Universe #18, Brave and the Bold #89, #98, and #145, Showcase #80, Justice League of America #103, House of Secrets #150, DC Super-Stars #18, and DC Comics Presents #25 and #72.

Represent!

In hardcover, collecting DC’s digital-first anthology series, with stories by Chris Cooper and others.

Robin Vol. 1

In paperback, collecting issues #1-6 by Joshua Williamson and Gleb Melnikov.

RWBY/Justice League

Collects 14 chapters of the crossover between the animated series and the Justice League, by Marguerite Bennett and Aneke.

Sandman Vol. 1: Preludes And Nocturnes (Mass Market Edition)

Issues #1-8, per usual, though the $50 price hardly seems right. I’m going to guess “mass market edition” means a TV-inspired cover, at least.

Shazam!

In paperback in April, collecting the four-issue miniseries by Tim Sheridan, tying in to Teen Titans Academy.

Shazam! Thundercrack

YA graphic novel set between the previous and upcoming Shazam! movies, written and drawn by Yehudi Mercado.

Starman Compendium Two

Collects the last half of James Robinson's Starman, including All-Star Comics 80-Page Giant #1, Batman/Hellboy/Starman #1-2, JSA All-Stars #4, Starman #43-81, Starman #1 (1998) (not particularly sure what this is, maybe "The Mist"), Starman/Congorilla #1 (getting into Robinson's later Justice League days), Stars and S.T.R.I.P.E. #0, and The Shade #1-12 (the New 52-era mini).

Static: Season One

In hardcover, collecting issues #1-6 of the new Static series by Vita Ayala.

Suicide Squad Vol. 2

Second collection of the Infinite Frontier-era series, collecting issues #7-12 and the 2021 annual.

Suicide Squad: Bad Blood

Paperback by Tom Taylor and Bruno Redondo, following the hardcover.

Suicide Squad: Get Joker!

In hardcover in April. collecting the three-issue miniseries by Brian Azzarello and Alex Maleev.

Supergirl: Woman of Tomorrow

In paperback in July, this is the eight-issue miniseries by Tom King and Bilquis Evely.

Superman '78

In hardcover in July, collecting the first 12 chapters of the digital series by Robert Venditti and Wilfredo Torres.

Superman: Action Comics Vol. 1: Warworld Rising

Phillip Kennedy Johnson’s first full Action Comics collection, coming in February in paperback. Collects Action Comics #1030–1035.

Superman: Son of Kal-El Vol. 1

In paperback in May, the first six issues of the new series by Tom Taylor and John Timms.

Superman: The Golden Age Omnibus Vol. 7

Includes Action Comics #125-143, Superman #55-65, and World’s Finest Comics #37-47.

Tales From the DC Dark Multiverse II

In paperback, following the hardcover (which I just recently reviewed, this is the Dark Multiverse takes on Batman: Hush, Flashpoint, Wonder Woman: War of the Gods, Crisis on Infinite Earths, and Dark Nights: Metal.

Talon by James Tynion IV

In paperback, coming in April, this is issues #1-17 of James Tynion’s first DC series. Though not a seminal work, it had a lot of ties to the DCU at the time, and I’m pleased for a chance to read the whole thing all together.

Teen Titans Academy Vol. 1: X Marks His Spot

In paperback in July, following the hardcover due out in January, by Tim Sheridan and Rafa Sandoval, and collecting issue #1-5 and sundries.

Teen Titans Academy Vol. 2

In hardcover in July (in time for the paperback of Vol. 1), this is issues #6-12.

Teen Titans by Geoff Johns Omnibus (2022 Edition)

New printing of the Geoff Johns run. Previously this was Teen Titans #1/2-26, 29-46 and 50, Legends of the DC Universe #2, Titans Secret Files #2, Teen Titans/Outsiders Secret Files 2003, Beast Boy #1-4, Teen Titans/Legion Of Super Heroes Special #1, Outsiders #24-25, Robin #147 (maybe also #146?), Infinite Crisis #5-6, and Teen Titans Annual #1.

Teen Titans: Beast Boy Loves Raven

In hardcover by Kami Garcia and Gabriel Picolo.

The Batman & Scooby-Doo Mystery Vol. 2

Issues #7-12 by Sholly Fisch and company.

The Batman Box Set

Batman: The Long Halloween, Batman: Ego and Other Tails, and Batman: Year One.

The Batman's Grave: The Complete Collection

Paperback collection of the 12-issue miniseries, following the hardcover.

The Flintstones: The Deluxe Edition

In hardcover in February, collecting Mark Russell and Steve Pugh's entire Flintstones run — Flintstones #1-12 and the Booster Gold/The Flintstones Special.

The Fourth World by Jack Kirby Box Set

No word if this is series-specific paperbacks or something like the omnibuses, etc. I’m pretty sure Darkseid is in it.

The Green Lantern Season Two Vol. 2

Paperback finale of the Grant Morrison series, following the hardcover. Collects issues #7-12.

The Joker War Saga

Paperback, following the hardcover, of Batman #95-100, the tie-ins from Batgirl, Red Hood and the Outlaws, Catwoman, Harley Quinn, Nightwing, Detective Comics, and the Joker War Zone special.

The Question by Dennis O'Neil Omnibus Vol. 1

I'd as soon the paperbacks come around again, but this is better than nothing (and might signify new smaller collections to follow). Collects The Question #1-27, The Question Annual #1, Green Arrow Annual #1, and Detective Comics Annual #1. The series would go to issue #36 plus five "Quarterly" issues.

The Sandman: The Deluxe Edition Book Five

Collects Sandman #70-75, Sandman: The Dream Hunters #1-4, Sandman: Endless Nights, Sandman: Dream Hunters 30th Anniversary Edition (prose version), and Dust Covers: The Collected Sandman Covers. Arrived in February in hardcover. I was hoping these would come out a little quicker since I'd decided these would finally be the volumes for my Sandman re-read before the Netflix series, but I think that's going to outpace these. And, Overture is nowhere to be found, meaning at least one more volume, though I wonder what else they might put in to fill out a sixth book.

Time Warp: Doomsday Tales and Other Things

Time Warp was a DC sci-fi anthology series from the late 1970s. There were five issues published, plus stories that appeared instead in The Unexpected #195, and a Vertigo one-shot with a story by Damon Kindelof and Jeff Lemire. Solicitations make it sound like the hardcover includes all of these.

Time Warp was a DC sci-fi anthology series from the late 1970s. There were five issues published, plus stories that appeared instead in The Unexpected #195, and a Vertigo one-shot with a story by Damon Kindelof and Jeff Lemire. Solicitations make it sound like the hardcover includes all of these.

Who's Who Omnibus Vol. 2

Continuing the long-awaited collection series, this is Who’s Who in the DC Universe #1-16 (what I believe is the 1990s "loose-leaf" version), Who’s Who in the Legion of Super-Heroes #1-7, and Who’s Who Update 1993 #1-2.

Wonder Woman: Agent of Peace Vol. 2

Second collection of the digital-first series, collecting issues #12-23.

Zatanna: The Jewel of Gravesend

YA graphic novel by Alys Arden and Jacquelin de Leon.